Bootstrap Homes

Attempting to defy Vimes's theory of boots

juliakwon:

    “[I painted the drab and uniform communist-style buildings with bright and strong colors as] a wake-up call for people.  Bringing people in was not through words, but through giving them signs that yes, the city can be livable and so, everyone can enjoy it.  The effect was fantastic because people started to participate and then started to reshape their shops and everything so they felt safer.  And this was a beautiful thing.  What you can do with colors, with greenery, with lighting, with public spaces, you can never do with police and law enforcement in a neighborhood where people have nothing to lose.”

    — Edi Rama, CNN PressRoom Blog

(via swaggregator)

hermit-queen-persephone:

rhazade-waterbender:

thinksquad:

Utah is ending homelessness by giving people an apartment or home.
Earlier this month, Hawaii State representative Tom Bower (D) began walking the streets of his Waikiki district with a sledgehammer, and smashing shopping carts used by homeless people. “Disgusted” by the city’s chronic homelessness problem, Bower decided to take matters into his own hands — literally. He also took to rousing homeless people if he saw them sleeping at bus stops during the day.
Bower’s tactics were over the top, and so unpopular that he quickly declared “Mission accomplished,” and retired his sledgehammer. But Bower’s frustration with his city’s homelessness problem is just an extreme example of the frustration that has led cities to pass measures that effective deal with the homeless by criminalizing homelessness.
City council members in Columbia, South Carolina, concerned that the city was becoming a “magnet for homeless people,” passed an ordinance giving the homeless the option to either relocate or get arrested. The council later rescinded the ordinance, after backlash from police officers, city workers, and advocates.
Last year, Tampa, Florida — which had the most homeless people for a mid-sized city — passed an ordinance allowing police officers to arrest anyone they saw sleeping in public, or “storing personal property in public.” The city followed up with a ban on panhandling downtown, and other locations around the city.
Philadelphia took a somewhat different approach, with a law banning the feeding of homeless people on city parkland. Religious groups objected to the ban, and announced that they would not obey it.
Raleigh, North Carolina took the step of asking religious groups to stop their longstanding practice of feeding the homeless in a downtown park on weekends. Religious leaders announced that they would risk arrest rather than stop.
This trend makes Utah’s accomplishment even more noteworthy. In eight years, Utah has quietly reduced homelessness by 78 percent, and is on track to end homelessness by 2015.
How did Utah accomplish this? Simple. Utah solved homelessness by giving people homes. In 2005, Utah figured out that the annual cost of E.R. visits and jail says for homeless people was about $16,670 per person, compared to $11,000 to provide each homeless person with an apartment and a social worker. So, the state began giving away apartments, with no strings attached. Each participant in Utah’s Housing First program also gets a caseworker to help them become self-sufficient, but the keep the apartment even if they fail. The program has been so successful that other states are hoping to achieve similar results with programs modeled on Utah’s.

#solve homelessness by giving people homes? unbelievable

Holy shit, go Utah.

hermit-queen-persephone:

rhazade-waterbender:

thinksquad:

Utah is ending homelessness by giving people an apartment or home.

Earlier this month, Hawaii State representative Tom Bower (D) began walking the streets of his Waikiki district with a sledgehammer, and smashing shopping carts used by homeless people. “Disgusted” by the city’s chronic homelessness problem, Bower decided to take matters into his own hands — literally. He also took to rousing homeless people if he saw them sleeping at bus stops during the day.

Bower’s tactics were over the top, and so unpopular that he quickly declared “Mission accomplished,” and retired his sledgehammer. But Bower’s frustration with his city’s homelessness problem is just an extreme example of the frustration that has led cities to pass measures that effective deal with the homeless by criminalizing homelessness.

City council members in Columbia, South Carolina, concerned that the city was becoming a “magnet for homeless people,” passed an ordinance giving the homeless the option to either relocate or get arrested. The council later rescinded the ordinance, after backlash from police officers, city workers, and advocates.

Last year, Tampa, Florida — which had the most homeless people for a mid-sized city — passed an ordinance allowing police officers to arrest anyone they saw sleeping in public, or “storing personal property in public.” The city followed up with a ban on panhandling downtown, and other locations around the city.

Philadelphia took a somewhat different approach, with a law banning the feeding of homeless people on city parkland. Religious groups objected to the ban, and announced that they would not obey it.

Raleigh, North Carolina took the step of asking religious groups to stop their longstanding practice of feeding the homeless in a downtown park on weekends. Religious leaders announced that they would risk arrest rather than stop.

This trend makes Utah’s accomplishment even more noteworthy. In eight years, Utah has quietly reduced homelessness by 78 percent, and is on track to end homelessness by 2015.

How did Utah accomplish this? Simple. Utah solved homelessness by giving people homes. In 2005, Utah figured out that the annual cost of E.R. visits and jail says for homeless people was about $16,670 per person, compared to $11,000 to provide each homeless person with an apartment and a social worker. So, the state began giving away apartments, with no strings attached. Each participant in Utah’s Housing First program also gets a caseworker to help them become self-sufficient, but the keep the apartment even if they fail. The program has been so successful that other states are hoping to achieve similar results with programs modeled on Utah’s.

Holy shit, go Utah.

(via ddreamsdreamscape)

couchnap:

polaroidtransfers:

Heat to the Rescue: Sturdy Oil Drum Survival Kit Also Converts Into Stove.

Like the Haitian earthquake of 2010, last year’s Japanese tsunami disaster spurred designers to re-think what an effective, life-saving response might look like.

Focusing on providing a source of heat, water and food housed in rollable oil drum that can be converted into a stove, Eindhoven-based Japanese designer Hikaru Imamura’s “Heat Rescue Disaster Recovery” kit reflects his belief that something as simple as heat and hot water may mean the difference between falling deathly ill or surviving.

this is fucking awesome.

(via ddreamsdreamscape)

Architect Student Converts Old Bus Into Luxury Rolling Home

Architect student Hank Butitta has a new home, although its on wheels. He made it with his own hands, and a little help from his friends, from an old bus he found on Craigslist.

Butitta got tired of designing buildings that didn’t exist for imaginary clients in school and wanted to work with his hands on something tangible. So he bought a bus off Craigslist and, with help from friend Justin Evidon and brother Vince, they spent nearly 14 weeks converting the run-down old bus into a sleek, modular living environment complete with a kitchen, bathroom, beds, storage, and even a floor made from wood panels stripped from an old gymnasium.

Now that Hank’s bus is finished, the group is embarking on a 5,000 mile tour around the U.S. which has just about reached its halfway point. You can see more photos, video, and follow their travels over at Hank Bought a Bus.

source

(Source: odditiesoflife, via swaggregator)

The reason that the rich were so rich, Vimes reasoned, was because they managed to spend less money.

Take boots, for example. He earned thirty-eight dollars a month plus allowances. A really good pair of leather boots cost fifty dollars. But an affordable pair of boots, which were sort of OK for a season or two and then leaked like hell when the cardboard gave out, cost about ten dollars. Those were the kind of boots Vimes always bought, and wore until the soles were so thin that he could tell where he was in Ankh-Morpork on a foggy night by the feel of the cobbles.

But the thing was that good boots lasted for years and years. A man who could afford fifty dollars had a pair of boots that’d still be keeping his feet dry in ten years’ time, while the poor man who could only afford cheap boots would have spent a hundred dollars on boots in the same time and would still have wet feet.

This was the Captain Samuel Vimes ‘Boots’ theory of socioeconomic unfairness.

Terry Pratchett, “Men At Arms”

This is one of the best breakdowns I’ve ever seen of how expensive it is to be poor. (via slephoto)

this is true on so many levels

I always think about the money my parents have spent fixing up our house or various used cars over the years

(via theuppitynegras)

This is actually a widely acknowledged “theory” in economics (I say theory because some idiots will argue against it but it’s been pretty well evidenced). Tax cuts to people making under 200,000 are generally more effective because people making under that usually have to consume every dollar they earn on a year to year basis, so the money they gain back in a tax break circulates within the economy. Where as those making above are more likely to save the money, or invest in a way that doesn’t add money back into the economy.

(via ahandsomestark)

(via batsbrains)

Re:Boot! - Epilogue

Heh! Someone finally planted the Maple. Rah’s had it since before she wrote up her thesis proposal: bought it at the Japanese Gardens during a sale near her birthday. She’s carried it in a pot with her through two years and four apartments. 

May 20, 5:34pm

So after all that, your writer worked a full day. It was the most relaxing day I’ve ever had on the job.  I had the chance to recount my adventures, and some people who had lived in New York shed telling light on why Rah’s building budget had gotten so high so fast: We’d been using debit cards instead of cash to buy many of our purchases, which in the smaller local shops added up to sales tax.

In New York, you have to spend money in order to spend money.  The sales receipts Rah kept confirmed the story.  My co-workers also gave me some first-hand accounts of how they had experienced being homeless in New York.  A lot of it matched up to the observations Rah and I had made, and there were some surprises and clever solutions we hadn’t even guessed at as well.

Off the clock at 5:30 pm, I was eager to return home so I could bathe and sleep…but I had to stop when I saw the demolished garden in the daylight. 

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Re:Boot! - Convention day

image

May 18, 7:43am

“Rah?”

“Mm?” She’s already wide awake, dressed for the convention, cream-gold and black skirt and strappy shoes and a black and white sash, and trying to eat something in spite of not being that hungry just yet. I’ve just sat up from a dream about painting fish and I’m currently sizing up my day.

We have an airplane hanger full of people, a cab ride, a new airport, a very long plane ride with a layover in Minneapolis again, a max-line trip and a bus ride home…and then for me, back to work. This was technically a very long vacation and I’m still not sure what my work schedule will look like after this. I decide to complain about the obvious.

“I don’t know how you got me through customs. Is it just California and Canada that have problems with folks smuggling their exotic fruit over the border?” Rah smiles. She’s worrying about me, which means she won’t be worried about herself. That’s something at least.

We’ve gotta go meet Deb if we’re riding in. Hope I can score coffee and that both of us are ready for breakfast by the time we reach the Javits center.

Re:Boot! - So, Two Introverts walk into New York…


image(This photo dedicated to Martin French, Head of PNCA’s Illustration Department. We both immediately thought of you when we passed by.)

11:22pm - 

Deb peeked in around the time I finished the prior post to ask us what our plans were. Dinner as a group was still nebulous and Team Fishboot was both quite done for the day…and had yet to really explore New York. And here we were, in the heart of Manhattan. Earlier in the trip noises had been made about us visiting the Highline park, and so Rah chirped up about going there.  

Deb lit up with a smile like sun through a fogbank. 

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